Are You Protein Deficient? (Continued)

chickenHow Much Protein Do I Need?

The protein recommendations for adults are 0.8 grams protein per kilogram of body weight. For a 150-pound woman, this equals 55 grams protein per day. For a 220-pounds man, this equals 80 grams protein per day.

A 3-ounce portion of meat (roughly the size of a deck of cards) contains about 21g of protein. A 4-ounce chicken breast or pork chop contains about 28 grams protein.

Here are the latest daily protein recommendations in ounce equivalents* from the USDA's My Plate guidelines (http://www.choosemyplate.gov/).

Children 2-3 years old 2 ounce equivalents
4-8 years old 4 ounce equivalents
Girls 9-13 years old 5 ounce equivalents
14-18 years old 5 ounce equivalents
Boys 9-13 years old 5 ounce equivalents
14-18 years old 6 1/2 ounce equivalents
Women 19-30 years old 5 1/2 ounce equivalents
31-50 years old 5 ounce equivalents
51 and older 5 ounce equivalents
Men 19-30 years old 6 1/2 ounce equivalents
31-50 years old 6 ounce equivalents
51 and older 5 1/2 ounce equivalents

 

* 1 ounce equivalent of protein includes:

  • 1 ounce of meat, poultry, or fish
  • 1/4 cup cooked beans
  • 1 egg
  • 1 tablespoon of peanut or almond butter
  • 2 ounces tofu
  • 1/2 ounce of nuts or seeds (12 almonds, 24 pistachios, 7 walnut halves)

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Last Modified Date: March 07, 2014

All content on dLife.com is created and reviewed in compliance with our editorial policy.
Sources
  1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Nutrition for Everyone. http://www.cdc.gov/nutrition/everyone/basics/protein.html (Accessed October 6, 2011.)
  2. United States Department of Agriculture; Choose My Plate. http://www.choosemyplate.gov/foodgroups/proteinfoods.html (Accessed October 6, 2011.)
  3. United States Department of Agriculture; Food and Nutrition Center http://fnic.nal.usda.gov/ (Accessed October 6, 2011.)

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