Healthy Swaps-Mushrooms

The ultimate guide to having your cake and eating it too (continued).

Mushrooms are an adult food –– their earthy flavor and texture are for the sophisticated palate –– but most of us never get much past the white, button mushrooms (officially known as agaricus) that top pizzas or find their way into soups and stews. Some of the other common varieties of these fascinating fungi are full of health benefits and worth experimenting with, such as: chanterelles, crimini, shiitake, oyster, enoki, portabello, porcini, and morel.

MushroomsResearch suggests that mushrooms may have anti-cancer properties, thanks to their rich array of phytochemicals and unique nutrient profile. Here are some substitutions that will crank up the health quotient of your meal, and also deliver the sumptuous, one-of-a-kind flavors:

  • Grilled portabellos in place of a bun for turkey, salmon, or beef burgers.
  • A medley of sauted mushrooms for half of the breading in stuffing.
  • In place of some of the mayo or other fat, add raw, chopped, or whole mushrooms to chicken, tuna, or other salads.
  • Finely chopped, sauted mushrooms to replace half or all of the ground beef in a recipe for pasta sauce, chili, tacos, or burritos.









 

 

 

Reviewed by Susan Weiner, R.D., M.S., C.D.E., C.D.N. 3/08
 

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22

Last Modified Date: June 17, 2013

All content on dLife.com is created and reviewed in compliance with our editorial policy.

More On This Topic

No items are associated with this tag

More On This Topic

No items are associated with this tag

Sign up for FREE dLife Newsletters

dLife Membership is FREE! Get exclusive access, free recipes, newsletters, savings, and much more! FPO

Congratulations!
You are subscribed!
Congratulations!
You are subscribed!
Congratulations!
You are subscribed!
45 Views 0 comments
by Nicole Purcell
I no longer wear an insulin pump. Nor do I wear a CGM. I wish the latter were different, as I think a CGM would be quite useful, but the welts that it leaves on my skin - in spite of multiple efforts to fight that welts - are just unacceptable. I am, however, still interested in when people remove their pumps and why. I've seen some recent discussion around folks being asked to remove their pump for mammogram procedure, so I figured I'd ask around the hospital I work to...