Healthy Swaps-Apple Spread

The ultimate guide to having your cake and eating it too (continued).

Are you stuck in a morning toast rut? With diabetes, your options for morning toast may seem limited to trans-fat free margarine or dicey, low-carb or reduced-sugar jams. Consider whipping up your own apple spread.

The good thing about apples is that, no matter where you live, they are available year-round in your supermarket. And they are loaded with antioxidants and fiber. The scientific research on apples has shot this modest fruit into the spotlight. Recent findings have shown that the compounds in apples may reduce cholesterol, improve the health of arteries, reduce the risk of several types of cancer, and even reduce age-related damage to brain cells. To get the most of apples' health punch, you need to eat the skin, because quercetin –– a star antioxidant –– is only found there.

ApplesTo make apple spread, core and chop up enough apples (choose very sweet and crisp varieties, such as McIntosh, Jonagold, and Fuji) to almost fill your largest pot. Cook them in about an inch of water or apple cider until uniformly soft. Puree in food processor and return to pot. Add cinnamon, cloves, ginger, and allspice. Bring mixture to a boil, reduce heat, and simmer until thickened. Your spread should keep for up to two months refrigerated in an airtight container.




Reviewed by Susan Weiner, R.D., M.S., C.D.E., C.D.N. 3/08


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Last Modified Date: June 17, 2013

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by Carey Potash
Charlie’s 12-year anniversary with type 1 just passed and I still know nothing about this diabetes and why it hates us so much. As if to remind us that it was its anniversary, diabetes unleashed hell on Friday. Charlie was stranded well over 400 for hours and even tipped the scale at 580. Susanne pulled Charlie out of school and started what became a wartime exercise in futility. It was one of the worst blood sugar days we’ve had in years. ...